Queer Under All Conditions

:]

14 notes

Homodachi and Friends Issue #1: Visibility / Invisibility!

homodachizine:

image

Hello folks!

We are proud to present the first issue of Homodachi and Friends!  This issue looks at the intersections of queerness and concepts of visibility/invisibility.  How does our understanding of queerness change in Japan?  What is the role of visibility, and how does it compare and contrast to our home countries?  What are moments where we need to be hyper-aware of our queerness, in what moments does the invisibility of our queerness surprise us? Our contributors range widely in their writing styles and experiences, so there is sure to be something for everyone!  :)

Click on the image above or click this link to read the first issue for free online!  The file is large so please be patient while it loads!  Print versions will be available in mid-August.  If you would like a print copy, please contact us directly!

If you like the project, please consider sharing it with your friends, liking the facebook page, and following our twitter!  You can also contact us at:

homodachizine (at) gmail.com


Without further adieu, please enjoy!

-H&F

12 notes

homodachizine:

Homodachi and Friends Call For Submissions #1!!!!  Visibility / Invisibility!!!
Welcome to the first issue of Homodachi and Friends. We are dedicated to archiving the diverse voices of the queer and trans community living in Japan. We believe that in telling our stories, we not only empower ourselves, but we also begin to carve space for others to claim their own experiences and identities as well. It is with this hope that we write this call for submissions for the project.In line with our mission statement for the project, the first theme of the first issue will be related to (In)Visibility(s). *Potential ideas include, but are not limited to:* How has the visibility of queerness in your home country compared and contrasted with the visibility of queerness in your area of residence in Japan? How has invisibility also compared and contrasted?What does (in)visibility mean for the queer/trans community? How are these meanings guided by cultural and other discursive forces?In the West, there is a high value assigned to being “out” and “proud,” and often times this can be an entry point in to the community and its politics. How has this conditioned your queerness/transness? How is this in conversation with a Japanese sensibility of tatemae (public, outer face for work / certain spaces) and honne (the true self, the inwards facing self.)?How have you gauged when to be visible and when to be invisible? When was a moment when you felt conflicted about this decision?We as queer/trans folks are never 100% “out.” Coming out is never a complete process, we are always meeting new people and having to come out over and over again. How have you understood this process? How has this process shaped your experiences in your home country and abroad/in Japan?How is visibility and invisibility guided by language? In other words, a lot of our identities are produced when we articulate them, when we speak them. How have language barriers produced visibility / invisibility? What is your relationship to language acquisition / ability and your identity as a queer/trans person in Japan?In Japan, the transgender narrative/body is hypervisible, while the LGB body is comparatively invisible. How has this scripting of queer/trans bodies affected your experiences here in Japan? How has this scripting created communicative moments or moments of intense misunderstanding?_______________________________________ As mentioned above, please do not feel that submissions need to be restricted to or specifically answer these questions. Homodachi is interested in hearing as many different voices as possible, in whatever form or on whatever topic they choose to speak. If in the process of writing your piece unfolds into something else and deviates from the questions above, we’d still love to take a look. If you have an older piece which you think might be relevant to this issue (or not, hey, we’ll read it anyway) please feel free to submit it, too. Prose, memoir, journal entries, meditations, theorizations, poems, rants, letters, and any other genres are more than welcome!Homodachi has a commitment to local artists, poets, and musicians—we would love to have your work in the next issue. If your work is multimedia, we can publish the material here on this blog and on our facebook for our readers!***Please aim to have finalized submissions emailed to us by June 21st, 2014 at HomodachiZine@gmail.com***Included in your submission, please include the name that you would like to be printed under, contact information (email, blog, website, etc.) for our readers, and any other information that you would like to be printed alongside your submission. Also, please include a current mailing address so that the editors can send you a complimentary copy of the first issue as a thanks for helping out with the project :]! Also, the Homodachi editors will need help with layouts and collages, if you would like to participate in a zine-making / background-making session, please email or message the editors.The best way to stay up to date with the project is to “like” the facebook page and to (continue) following the tumblr blog.We greatly appreciate all of the time and effort of the contributors, fellow zinesters, friends, and supporters of the project.We greatly anticipate your work, comments, suggestions, and love. In solidarity:Homodachi Editorial Team
https://www.facebook.com/events/1425198971075417/

homodachizine:

Homodachi and Friends Call For Submissions #1!!!!  Visibility / Invisibility!!!

Welcome to the first issue of Homodachi and Friends. We are dedicated to archiving the diverse voices of the queer and trans community living in Japan. We believe that in telling our stories, we not only empower ourselves, but we also begin to carve space for others to claim their own experiences and identities as well. It is with this hope that we write this call for submissions for the project.

In line with our mission statement for the project, the first theme of the first issue will be related to (In)Visibility(s)

*Potential ideas include, but are not limited to:*
 

How has the visibility of queerness in your home country compared and contrasted with the visibility of queerness in your area of residence in Japan? How has invisibility also compared and contrasted?

What does (in)visibility mean for the queer/trans community? How are these meanings guided by cultural and other discursive forces?

In the West, there is a high value assigned to being “out” and “proud,” and often times this can be an entry point in to the community and its politics. How has this conditioned your queerness/transness? How is this in conversation with a Japanese sensibility of tatemae (public, outer face for work / certain spaces) and honne (the true self, the inwards facing self.)?

How have you gauged when to be visible and when to be invisible? When was a moment when you felt conflicted about this decision?

We as queer/trans folks are never 100% “out.” Coming out is never a complete process, we are always meeting new people and having to come out over and over again. How have you understood this process? How has this process shaped your experiences in your home country and abroad/in Japan?

How is visibility and invisibility guided by language? In other words, a lot of our identities are produced when we articulate them, when we speak them. How have language barriers produced visibility / invisibility? What is your relationship to language acquisition / ability and your identity as a queer/trans person in Japan?

In Japan, the transgender narrative/body is hypervisible, while the LGB body is comparatively invisible. How has this scripting of queer/trans bodies affected your experiences here in Japan? How has this scripting created communicative moments or moments of intense misunderstanding?
_______________________________________ 

As mentioned above, please do not feel that submissions need to be restricted to or specifically answer these questions. Homodachi is interested in hearing as many different voices as possible, in whatever form or on whatever topic they choose to speak. If in the process of writing your piece unfolds into something else and deviates from the questions above, we’d still love to take a look. If you have an older piece which you think might be relevant to this issue (or not, hey, we’ll read it anyway) please feel free to submit it, too. Prose, memoir, journal entries, meditations, theorizations, poems, rants, letters, and any other genres are more than welcome!

Homodachi has a commitment to local artists, poets, and musicians—we would love to have your work in the next issue. If your work is multimedia, we can publish the material here on this blog and on our facebook for our readers!

***Please aim to have finalized submissions emailed to us by June 21st, 2014 at HomodachiZine@gmail.com***

Included in your submission, please include the name that you would like to be printed under, contact information (email, blog, website, etc.) for our readers, and any other information that you would like to be printed alongside your submission. Also, please include a current mailing address so that the editors can send you a complimentary copy of the first issue as a thanks for helping out with the project :]! 

Also, the Homodachi editors will need help with layouts and collages, if you would like to participate in a zine-making / background-making session, please email or message the editors.

The best way to stay up to date with the project is to “like” the facebook page and to (continue) following the tumblr blog.

We greatly appreciate all of the time and effort of the contributors, fellow zinesters, friends, and supporters of the project.

We greatly anticipate your work, comments, suggestions, and love. 

In solidarity:
Homodachi Editorial Team

https://www.facebook.com/events/1425198971075417/

71 notes

BRUJAxCORE: HOAX ZINE IS HAVING A PRINTING EMERGENCY

ineffableshe:

hoaxzine:

Dear Hoax Zine readers and supporters,

Hoax Zine exists as a collaborative effort to name the ways in which the “isms” play out in our everyday lives. This project is rooted in a transformative framework of organizing, meaning that we strongly believe in concepts such as equal and nonhierarchical partnerships, the value of personal, cultural, and non-institutional knowledges, and that the personal can be made political through the process of storytelling. One of our goals is that readers and contributors alike can learn how to act as “allies” by bearing witness of the experiences of others.

Over the past four years, the two of us have taken on a plethora of responsibilities to keep this project alive. These responsibilities have included, but are in no way limited to: promoting our publication, painstakingly designing layouts, constructing and putting out calls for submissions, editing submissions and assisting contributors in developing their voices, sales, budgeting, and physically assembling every issue. During the past year, both of us have relocated to different states and have continued driving upwards of six hours to our printing source in Maryland. We have done this to ensure that the zine remains affordable and, thus, accessible.

Unfortunately, we can no longer continue printing Hoax Zine at this said source. The commute has exhausted both our energy and our bank accounts, and unfortunate life circumstances and family crises have made it nearly impossible to travel. Additionally, we just learned that our printing source has taken unprecedented and extreme measures to ensure that we will no longer have access to their printers.

For this reason, we are asking our readers for help. We are looking for access to discounted, double-sided, mass printing in the New York City Metropolitan area. We would be able and willing to travel throughout New Jersey and to Philadelphia if necessary. Private colleges are very likely to have these resources and, if you are a student at such an institution, we would especially appreciate your support. We are also willing to work with a student anywhere in the United States who has access to mass printing to set up an established internship. Contact us as hoaxzine at gmail dot com for more information.

Until we can access a new printing source, we will only be selling an extremely small number of each issue on our Etsy shop. This includes each of our individual zines that are currently for sale (You’ve Got a Friend in Pennsylvania #3-7; Thou Shalt Not Talk About the White Boys’ Club: Challenging the Unwritten Rules of Punk; Neither Doll Houses Nor Tree Houses: On Living Outside of the Gender Binary;  Reimaging Queer Community; Not Queer as in Radical but Lesbian as in Fuck You). This way, we will ensure that we do not run out of any remaining issues and can mail people and distros that have already sent us payments.

Regardless of your location or access to printing, we would greatly appreciate it if you re-blog and share this post in full on Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter, etc.

Thank you and in solidarity,

sari and Rachel

PLEASE HELP US BY RE-BLOGGING THIS

(via fuckyeahqueermusic)

72 notes

hoaxzine:

inmidnightblood:

[img: a black and white photo of the side of a mountain with heavy clouds overhead. black text over top reads, “you’ve got a friend in pennsylvania #7 / on queerness, introversion, & friendship theory”.]
you’ve got a friend in pennsylvania #7: on queerness, introversion, & friendship theory
since moving to a state i hate roughly a year ago, i’ve been kind of a hermit. i rarely go out while home and when i do, its to places i already feel comfortable in to see people i already know. as time has passed in my self-inflicted solitary confinement, i’ve been preoccupied with thinking about what friendships mean to me overall. in the 5 sections of this zine, i try to hash out my thoughts on the process of making and keeping friends, how my various identities intersect and affect my friendships, the spaces in which friendships are cultivated or cut off, and how i can improve my friendship skills. this zine is B&W, 1/4 size, 38 pages, & text heavy. US$2.50 (price can be negotiated). [etsy / snail mail & other arrangements] note: this zine will debut at chicago zine fest - any copies not sold there will be mailed out to the first etsy orders & messaged requests.
i like being alone (just not all the time) / intro

What if we applied our childhood methods of friendship and knowledge-sharing to our current lives? What if we broke down the practice of cultivating certain abilities and qualities in friendships with the aim of utilizing them in monogamous relationships? What if our culture valued friendships the way it values romantic pairings (as an aside, I could find hardly any songs across a variety of musical genres that dealt with celebrating friendship instead of sexual interest)?

I. the myth of a good friend
on achieving the label of “good friend”

The idea of being a Good Friend is often dependent on how selfless and accommodating you are with others, and this is problematic for a whole lot of reasons, including using one’s friendship as an excuse to manipulate or guilt someone and the fact that many people are unable to communicate their boundaries as far as being capable of taking on the problems of others on top of their own. 

on hierarchic friendship distinctions & queer in-groupings

Unfortunately those of us who had a hell of a time surviving social situations as queer people end up building up cliques and establishing borders surrounding the communities that are often seen as threatened by outsiders; as if queerer-than-thou mentalities and social functions with judgmental foundations are somehow consistently wary of Trojan horses pregnant to the brim with posturing straight people or queer folks who don’t fuck enough.

II. a sober introvert’s conundrum: go online or go out?
on utilizing bodily markers as conversation starters

But as I’ve been digging deeper and deeper into my feelings about my own gender and gender in general, I’ve released the tight grip I had on my beliefs that decorating my body or vocalizing certain interests would automatically put me at risk for being misgendered—and unfortunately a big factor that helped me do that was coming to the sad realization that I’ll be misgendered no matter what… Feminine body markers have always been a means of starting conversations or breaking the ice with women and non-binary folks and I no longer want to let the fear of being misread keep me from any additional opportunities to make those kinds of friends. 

on my sobriety intensifying my introversion

I don’t want to continue seeing bar culture/non-sober spaces as some kind of duality between being comfortable yet by myself versus having companions in a potentially hostile atmosphere. It’s also been really difficult feeling like I am completely complicit in my introversion as well as my discomfort with alcohol. A part of me feels like I have to go along to get along and that it’s no use being critical of bar culture because nothing proactive will come out of it. It’s much easier telling myself that I wouldn’t meet anyone interesting at the events I miss, that if I drank I would just create a laundry list of regrets, and that I have to become more comfortable with alcohol for the sake of making friends instead of for the sake of healing a wounded part of myself. 

III. friends with/out benefits
on restrictive terminology

I really don’t like the terminology of “friends with benefits.” When I think of what that looks like for me, I imagine a friend coming over to hang out, and surprise!, they’ve brought vegan pizza. The insinuation that friendship, specifically one of a platonic nature, isn’t already beneficial should be pretty insulting to anyone who identifies as a friend. When applied to hookup situations, the distinction is meant to imply that the relationship between two people is exponentially enjoyable because it includes a sexual aspect. 

on dating as a means of displaying one’s queerness / desirability

Sharing meals with others was a foundational part of my family’s notions of unity, care, and bonding. Eating together gave us an opportunity to intentionally be in the same physical space at a certain time while sharing a vital part of our daily lives. As someone who thrives in very small groups and quiet settings, eating with a few other people can be a really intimate time for me, and I don’t think it’s a coincidence that going out to eat or planning an evening around a meal is very common for romantic (or otherwise) dates. 

IV. boundaries, choices, and limitations
on geography as a determining factor in finding friends

[Since I left the place I grew up] I’ve felt more empowered in my choice of friends and like I finally have the option to be around people who I don’t have to feel defensive or unsafe around all the time.  And I am emphatically holding onto the notion that I don’t have to settle for sub-par friendships anymore. If I have friend-related deal breakers or standards, I am allowed to and should express them. I also feel much more comfortable drawing and sticking to boundaries with friends now than I did before. 

on creating emotional boundaries in coercive work environments

I am pretty unashamed to say that a means of coping with the emotional toll my shitty minimum-wage jobs take on me is routinely lying to my customers when they ask for personal information about me or otherwise try to find faux-connections with me… I don’t reinvent a completely new personality or make up tall tales about my past, but I also don’t answer honestly when queried about where I live, what my family is like, what I do off the clock, or, yeah, how much I actually like my job. Keeping myself at a safe emotional distance from strangers, not just at work, is pretty vital to my sense of self-preservation.

V. becoming a better friend
on sticking to my boundaries

In Season 3 of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Willow likened her reputation as “reliable” to being a pushover. In many situations I’ve also felt that my feelings towards and care for my friends has been misguided and manipulated in order to take advantage of me. Communicating my limits, discomforts, triggers, and sensitivities will allow me to feel more empowered to ensure that my boundaries are recognized and respected. I will work on not feeling like a terrible friend if I cannot meet a friend where they’re at emotionally, and I will not view traversing my own limits in the name of friendship as proof that I am a strong and capable human being. 

on cultivating offline interactions

While I’ve shown throughout this zine that the internet has been a means of helping me feel connected to something tangible, I cannot keep utilizing it as the only lifeline to old and new acquaintances. I can no longer make excuses for the reasons why I do not have regular contact with potential and already-established friends. My sobriety is never a reason to discard invitations to various events, as is my location in a state I hate. It’s pretty impossible that I’m the only marginalized person within a 50 mile radius—I just have to get out there and find others like me.


hoax co-editor sari’s new perzine!

hoaxzine:

inmidnightblood:

[img: a black and white photo of the side of a mountain with heavy clouds overhead. black text over top reads, “you’ve got a friend in pennsylvania #7 / on queerness, introversion, & friendship theory”.]

you’ve got a friend in pennsylvania #7: on queerness, introversion, & friendship theory

since moving to a state i hate roughly a year ago, i’ve been kind of a hermit. i rarely go out while home and when i do, its to places i already feel comfortable in to see people i already know. as time has passed in my self-inflicted solitary confinement, i’ve been preoccupied with thinking about what friendships mean to me overall. in the 5 sections of this zine, i try to hash out my thoughts on the process of making and keeping friends, how my various identities intersect and affect my friendships, the spaces in which friendships are cultivated or cut off, and how i can improve my friendship skills. this zine is B&W, 1/4 size, 38 pages, & text heavy. US$2.50 (price can be negotiated). [etsy / snail mail & other arrangements] note: this zine will debut at chicago zine fest - any copies not sold there will be mailed out to the first etsy orders & messaged requests.

i like being alone (just not all the time) / intro

What if we applied our childhood methods of friendship and knowledge-sharing to our current lives? What if we broke down the practice of cultivating certain abilities and qualities in friendships with the aim of utilizing them in monogamous relationships? What if our culture valued friendships the way it values romantic pairings (as an aside, I could find hardly any songs across a variety of musical genres that dealt with celebrating friendship instead of sexual interest)?

I. the myth of a good friend

on achieving the label of “good friend”

The idea of being a Good Friend is often dependent on how selfless and accommodating you are with others, and this is problematic for a whole lot of reasons, including using one’s friendship as an excuse to manipulate or guilt someone and the fact that many people are unable to communicate their boundaries as far as being capable of taking on the problems of others on top of their own.

on hierarchic friendship distinctions & queer in-groupings

Unfortunately those of us who had a hell of a time surviving social situations as queer people end up building up cliques and establishing borders surrounding the communities that are often seen as threatened by outsiders; as if queerer-than-thou mentalities and social functions with judgmental foundations are somehow consistently wary of Trojan horses pregnant to the brim with posturing straight people or queer folks who don’t fuck enough.

II. a sober introvert’s conundrum: go online or go out?

on utilizing bodily markers as conversation starters

But as I’ve been digging deeper and deeper into my feelings about my own gender and gender in general, I’ve released the tight grip I had on my beliefs that decorating my body or vocalizing certain interests would automatically put me at risk for being misgendered—and unfortunately a big factor that helped me do that was coming to the sad realization that I’ll be misgendered no matter what… Feminine body markers have always been a means of starting conversations or breaking the ice with women and non-binary folks and I no longer want to let the fear of being misread keep me from any additional opportunities to make those kinds of friends.

on my sobriety intensifying my introversion

I don’t want to continue seeing bar culture/non-sober spaces as some kind of duality between being comfortable yet by myself versus having companions in a potentially hostile atmosphere. It’s also been really difficult feeling like I am completely complicit in my introversion as well as my discomfort with alcohol. A part of me feels like I have to go along to get along and that it’s no use being critical of bar culture because nothing proactive will come out of it. It’s much easier telling myself that I wouldn’t meet anyone interesting at the events I miss, that if I drank I would just create a laundry list of regrets, and that I have to become more comfortable with alcohol for the sake of making friends instead of for the sake of healing a wounded part of myself.

III. friends with/out benefits

on restrictive terminology

I really don’t like the terminology of “friends with benefits.” When I think of what that looks like for me, I imagine a friend coming over to hang out, and surprise!, they’ve brought vegan pizza. The insinuation that friendship, specifically one of a platonic nature, isn’t already beneficial should be pretty insulting to anyone who identifies as a friend. When applied to hookup situations, the distinction is meant to imply that the relationship between two people is exponentially enjoyable because it includes a sexual aspect.

on dating as a means of displaying one’s queerness / desirability

Sharing meals with others was a foundational part of my family’s notions of unity, care, and bonding. Eating together gave us an opportunity to intentionally be in the same physical space at a certain time while sharing a vital part of our daily lives. As someone who thrives in very small groups and quiet settings, eating with a few other people can be a really intimate time for me, and I don’t think it’s a coincidence that going out to eat or planning an evening around a meal is very common for romantic (or otherwise) dates.

IV. boundaries, choices, and limitations

on geography as a determining factor in finding friends

[Since I left the place I grew up] I’ve felt more empowered in my choice of friends and like I finally have the option to be around people who I don’t have to feel defensive or unsafe around all the time.  And I am emphatically holding onto the notion that I don’t have to settle for sub-par friendships anymore. If I have friend-related deal breakers or standards, I am allowed to and should express them. I also feel much more comfortable drawing and sticking to boundaries with friends now than I did before.

on creating emotional boundaries in coercive work environments

I am pretty unashamed to say that a means of coping with the emotional toll my shitty minimum-wage jobs take on me is routinely lying to my customers when they ask for personal information about me or otherwise try to find faux-connections with me… I don’t reinvent a completely new personality or make up tall tales about my past, but I also don’t answer honestly when queried about where I live, what my family is like, what I do off the clock, or, yeah, how much I actually like my job. Keeping myself at a safe emotional distance from strangers, not just at work, is pretty vital to my sense of self-preservation.

V. becoming a better friend

on sticking to my boundaries

In Season 3 of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Willow likened her reputation as “reliable” to being a pushover. In many situations I’ve also felt that my feelings towards and care for my friends has been misguided and manipulated in order to take advantage of me. Communicating my limits, discomforts, triggers, and sensitivities will allow me to feel more empowered to ensure that my boundaries are recognized and respected. I will work on not feeling like a terrible friend if I cannot meet a friend where they’re at emotionally, and I will not view traversing my own limits in the name of friendship as proof that I am a strong and capable human being.

on cultivating offline interactions

While I’ve shown throughout this zine that the internet has been a means of helping me feel connected to something tangible, I cannot keep utilizing it as the only lifeline to old and new acquaintances. I can no longer make excuses for the reasons why I do not have regular contact with potential and already-established friends. My sobriety is never a reason to discard invitations to various events, as is my location in a state I hate. It’s pretty impossible that I’m the only marginalized person within a 50 mile radius—I just have to get out there and find others like me.

hoax co-editor sari’s new perzine!

23 notes

acbreid:

Call for submissions:
Aporia vol. 1: An inquisition into the experience of power and identity
——
This is it! My first zine. I am looking for submissions of all kinds (drawings, comics, paintings, photography, poetry, essays, short stories, rants, etc.). It has to fit into a black & white zine and also fit with this volume’s theme, “experience of power and identity,” with an emphasis on experience. 
I am aiming to collect all submissions by July 15, so that I have time to edit the pieces and arrange it thoughtfully into one volume by sometime in August. Please contact me with questions and submissions via aporia.zine@gmail.com. If you are still working on ideas but want to contribute, email me and we’ll figure it out together.
Looking forward to your submissions!
-Alex Cb

acbreid:

Call for submissions:

Aporia vol. 1: An inquisition into the experience of power and identity

——

This is it! My first zine. I am looking for submissions of all kinds (drawings, comics, paintings, photography, poetry, essays, short stories, rants, etc.). It has to fit into a black & white zine and also fit with this volume’s theme, “experience of power and identity,” with an emphasis on experience. 

I am aiming to collect all submissions by July 15, so that I have time to edit the pieces and arrange it thoughtfully into one volume by sometime in August. Please contact me with questions and submissions via aporia.zine@gmail.com. If you are still working on ideas but want to contribute, email me and we’ll figure it out together.

Looking forward to your submissions!

-Alex Cb

(via acbreid-deactivated20131001)

0 notes

LA Trans Film Festival is looking for submissions!

Hi All,

We are currently accepting submissions for the fourth annual Los Angeles Transgender Film Festival and I could really use your help in spreading the word.  If you have a film to submit, we’d love to see it!  Can you also forward this to all the queer and trans artists and community organizers you know?  We want to continue to screen amazing films, which means doing outreach to amazing filmmakers, so I thought of you.
Thanks!
- Kalil
The Los Angeles Transgender Film Festival is seeking films for our fourth annual film festival.  We will be screening many diverse works made by trans, genderqueer, and intersex artists, including comedy, dramedy, drama, experimental, animation, and more!  We also welcome work by allies who are showcasing “transgenderqueer” themes in their work.
========
SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
1. Accepting Feature Length and Short Films in all genres.
2. Complete the Festival Entry Form attached
3. Submit a DVD (Region 1) preview copy of your film/video. These items will be archived and will not be returned.
4. Include a CD of Stills (300 dpi, high resolution) if possible

www.tgfilmfest.com

52 notes

crustyriotqueer:

you’ve got a friend in pennsylvania #6

my issues with mental health have always been immensely difficult for me to assess, describe, and talk about. an intensely private person, i have kept most of my struggles to myself. in this zine, i attempt to investigate the traces of anxiety, depression, suicide, and alcoholism in my family’s history as well as my own difficulties with these issues. almost split into two zines due to volume, this issue is a hefty assortment of stories, thoughts, and emotions.

eight sections discuss: the secrecy surrounding my family’s history of suicides, a recent suicide in my family, my issues with anxiety and pushing emotions aside, my reoccuring suicidal thoughts and how my identities intersect with them, talking with a fellow queer/trans* friend struggling with suicide, assessing my tumultuous relationship with alcohol and deciding to become consciously sober, what i can do to manage and deal with things, and what i plan to do in the future. there is a trigger warning for the zine relating to depression, anxiety, suicide, self-harm, alcoholism, sexual assault, and abuse - please take care of yerself before you read this - it is intense.

this zine is extremely text heavy, black & white, 46 pages, and 1/2 size. for snail mail or trading, please e-mail youvegotafriendinpaATgmailDOTcom. for paypal/online payments, check out the listing on hoax’s etsy site. *if you can’t afford the going price of the zine, contact me and we can work something out.*

(Source: inmidnightblood, via welovezines)

64 notes

Queer Under All Conditions #4 Call for Submissions

hoaxzine:

queerunderallconditions:

QUAC is an Orange County (UCI)-based zine project dedicated to archiving and distributing queer/trans voices, histories, experiences, knowledge(s), and survival tactics in the face of violent silencing within public space and dominant culture.  As QUAC has become more established within the zine and queer/trans community, we’ve seen the growth and development of certain aesthetics, most notably anger, militancy, and rage.  These three aesthetics have functioned in multiple ways throughout QUAC, but we’ve found that the pieces that center these elements in their work are some of the most effective / thought-provoking pieces that start conversations and build community solidarity.  We, the editors, realize that there are often very few places queer and trans folk can publish angry / militant / raging things.  As social justice minded activists and organizers (in our own ways), we recognize that there are a lot of fucked up things in the world to be angry about, and for many of us, this anger can become destructive if it is not given the proper outlet.  As such, QUAC aims to become a space for this anger, to both “vent” a little bit, and to build a community in solidarity with the struggles of our complex and diverse community(s).

potential ideas for material include, but are not limited to: 

  • Uses of Anger:  How do you navigate (your) anger?  In what ways has anger been productive?  Destructive?  What constitutes productive/destructive anger? 
  • Coping mechanisms:  Often times, our organizing work is against structures that have been in existence for hundreds of years (racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, etc.).  Fighting battles that you cannot win within the next few days / weeks / months / years is physically, mentally, and spiritually tiring.  In what ways have you learned to navigate this?  How do you cope with the (violent) things occurring around you and your community(s)?
  • Queer militancy:  The queer and trans movements blossomed out of radical liberationist movements of the 50s and 60s.  However as we’ve seen, this liberationist framework has been obscured by more (homo)normative / liberal frameworks of thinking since the marriage equality movement of the early 90s.  In what ways are militancy and queerness linked, historically, epistemologically, and ontologically?  In what ways has a queer militancy resisted / subverted hetero/homonormativity?  How do you navigate your own queer militancy, or why do you refuse a queer militancy standpoint? 
  • Erasure:  In what ways have you experienced erasure?  We’ve noticed that a lot of anger / rage stems from a politics of visibility.  What is at stake for the silent / erased?  Can anger / rage break this silence?
  • Triggers:  What triggers your anger, rage, and/or your militancy?  When you recognize these triggers or possibilities of these triggers, what do you do pre-emptively?  How have you created spaces with these triggers in mind?  How can we create safer spaces, using our own experiences with anger and violence as insight?
  • Responses to anger:  How do you respond to anger and frustration?  How do you de-escalate situations?  How productive is anger for you?

As mentioned above, please do not feel that submissions need to be restricted to or specifically answer these questions. QUAC is interested in hearing as many different voices as possible, in whatever form or on whatever topic they choose to speak. If in the process of writing your piece unfolds into something else and deviates from the questions above, we’d still love to take a look. If you have an older piece which you think might be relevant to this issue (or not, hey, we’ll read it anyway) please feel free to submit it, too.

QUAC has always had a commitment to local artists, poets, and musicians—we would love to have your work in the next issue.  Please aim to have finalized submissions emailed to us by March 1st, 2012 at QueerZineUCI@gmail.com

Included in your submission, please include the name that you would like to be printed under, contact information (email, blog, website, etc.)  for our readers, and any other information that you would like to be printed alongside your submission.  Also, please include a current mailing address so that the editors can send you a complimentary copy of the fourth issue as a thanks for helping out with the project :]!

Also, the QUAC editors always need help with layouts and collages, if you would like to participate in a zine-making / background-making session, please email or message the editors.

The best way to stay up to date with the project is to (continue to) follow us on tumblr and “like” the facebook page.

We greatly appreciate all of the time and effort of the contributors, fellow zinesters, friends, and supporters of the project.

We greatly anticipate your work, comments, suggestions, and love.

In solidarity:
QUAC Editors

(Please reblog and repost elsewhere to spread the word.  If on tumblr, please reblog as text please so the whole post shows!  Thank you kindly!  :])

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